Riverwood Center Services Include:

Community Living Supports (CLS): Individual or group services delivered in your own home or in the community. Services are designed to train or assist you or your loved ones with achieving goals such as living as independently as possible, learning new skills such as cooking or budgeting, participating in community activities and assuring health and safety.
Outpatient Clinic Services: Individual, family or group counseling.
Psychiatric Services: Medication management to reduce and control symptoms of mental illness.
Respite Services: Provides temporary relief for a family or unpaid caregiver so you can continue to live in your family home.
Self-Determination: Self-determination is an optional way to deliver services in a way that gives you or your loved one more choice and control over your services. Find out more about the Self-Determination option.

AS WELL AS ADDITIONAL NEED-SPECIFIC SERVICES, INCLUDING:


services for
Mental Illness
 

Assertive Community Treatment (ACT): A team approach to help adults in the community who are having trouble living independently due to ongoing symptoms of their mental illness. The team helps you manage your medications without supports and helps if you frequently use inpatient hospital emergency services or crisis residential services. Physicians, nurses, social workers, peers and other specialists work together to reduce unnecessary hospital stays and increase your well-being.

Behavior Management Review: Support to create a behavior management plan that helps you or others you work with to change behaviors caused by an illness or disability. The behavior management plan is developed during person-centered planning and then is approved and reviewed regularly by a team of specialists to make sure that it is effective and dignified, and continues to meet your needs.

Case Management: Assistance with planning, linking and monitoring specialty services. For those who are vulnerable and/or have multiple service needs and are not able to arrange or access these services independently.

Community Inpatient Services: Hospital services used to stabilize someone experiencing a significant change in their symptoms, or in a mental health emergency. Community hospital services are provided in licensed psychiatric hospitals and in licensed psychiatric units of general hospitals.

Crisis Residential Services: Short-term alternatives to inpatient hospitalization provided in a licensed residential setting.

Employment Connections (Supported Employment): Help overcoming the challenges that a mental illness or developmental disability can have when finding and retaining a job. The Employment Specialists build relationships that foster opportunities for people with disabilities to get hired. Employment Connections matches the employer's needs with your abilities. Job development and long-term, follow-along services are available. In follow-along services, a job coach works with you for as long as you need support to maintain your job.

Family Psychoeducation (FPE): Working with you and your family in the long-term to develop coping skills to deal more effectively with a serious mental illness. Families participate in multi-family groups for problem-solving, or as an individual family in single-family FPE. Your family is anyone who helps and supports you.

Health Services: Includes assessment, treatment and professional monitoring of health conditions that are related to or impacted by your mental health condition. Your primary doctor will treat any other health conditions you may have.

Nursing Home Mental Health Assessment and Monitoring: A review of a nursing home resident's need for and response to mental health treatment, along with consultations with nursing home staff.

Peer-Delivered and Peer Specialist Services: Services delivered by your peers, including drop-in centers, are entirely run by people like you who use community mental health services. They offer help with food, clothing, socialization, housing and support to begin or maintain mental health treatment. Peer Specialist services are activities designed to help those with serious mental illness in their individual recovery journey and are provided by others who are in recovery from serious mental illness.

Residential Care Services: Residential care options range from staff assistance so you can remain in your own home to total supports in a structured, group home facility. The type and level of residential supports is based on your needs. Riverwood Center Supports Coordinators will discuss options and assure you live in the most independent and least restrictive settings possible.

Substance Use SUD Services: A person’s physical, psychological, social and spiritual life can be affected by substance abuse. Our goals are to help consumers:
    Maintain abstinence
    Learn healthy boundaries and improve interpersonal relationships
    Establish a sober support system
    Improve persons overall wellbeing
    Learn new healthy coping skills and relapse prevention
    Decrease the person’s negative involvement with the legal justice system

Services for Intellectual & Developmental Disabilities

 

Applied Behavior Analysis: Behavioral services provided by a team consisting of a Board Certified Behavior Analyst and a Behavior Technician/Aide. A treatment plan is developed to focus on reducing challenging behaviors and teaching skills in the areas of communication, play, socialization and daily living skills.

Community Inpatient Services are hospital services used to stabilize a mental health condition in the event of a significant change in symptoms, or in a mental health emergency. Community hospital services are provided in licensed psychiatric hospitals and in licensed psychiatric units of general hospitals.

Crisis Interventions: Unscheduled individual or group services aimed at reducing or eliminating the impact of unexpected events on mental health and well-being. Emergency mental health prescreens may be accessed at either Riverwood Center location during business hours or Lakeland Emergency Departments anytime.

Environmental Modifications are physical changes to a person's home, car, or work environment that are of direct medical or remedial benefit to the person. Modifications ensure access, protect health and safety, or enable greater independence for a person with physical disabilities. Note that other sources of funding must be explored first, before using Medicaid funds for environmental modifications.

Family Training Supports: Psychological services including consultation and training for family or staff members on how to improve quality of life by reducing maladaptive behaviors.

Nursing Home Mental Health Assessment and Monitoring includes a review of a nursing home resident's need for and response to mental health treatment, along with consultations with nursing home staff.

Occupational Therapy includes the evaluation by an occupational therapist of an individual's ability to do things in order to take care of themselves every day, and treatments to help increase these abilities.

Residential Care Services: Residential care options range from staff assistance so you can remain in your own home to total supports in a structured group home facility. The type and level of residential supports is based on individual needs. Riverwood Center Supports Coordinators will discuss options and assure individuals live in the most independent and least restrictive settings possible.

Skill Building Assistance: Vocational training to prepare for entering the general competitive workforce. Training is focused on areas such as increasing attention to task, interpersonal skills, accepting direction or constructive feedback, etc. Skill Building services must be related to a realistic goal of eventually entering the general competitive workforce.

Supported Employment: Assistance to search for, obtain and maintain meaningful paid employment in the community.

Supports Coordination: A Supports Coordinator can help you determine what is important for you and what services you may be eligible for. The Supports Coordinator facilitates a support circle including family, friends and clinicians to develop a Person-Centered Plan. Other responsibilities of a Supports Coordinator includes: linking with service providers, coordinating, advocating and monitoring services.

Services for
Children & Families

Case Management: Help for people who are vulnerable and/or have multiple service needs and can't arrange or access these services themselves. Includes help with service planning, linking and monitoring specialty services.

Community Inpatient Services: Hospital services used to stabilize someone experiencing a significant change in their symptoms, or in a mental health emergency. Community hospital services are provided in licensed psychiatric hospitals and in licensed psychiatric units of general hospitals.

Crisis Interventions: Unscheduled individual or group services aimed at helping people cope with unexpected events. Access emergency mental health prescreens at either Riverwood Center location during business hours or Lakeland Emergency Departments anytime.

Functional Family Therapy (FFT): An intensive, short-term, family-focused therapy program. A major goal of FFT is to improve family communication and supportiveness while decreasing the intense negativity. Other goals include helping family members adopt positive solutions to family problems, and developing positive behavior change and parenting strategies.

Home-Based Services: Intensive services for youth and families, provided in your home and in the community. Services promote normal child development, healthy family functioning, and supporting and preserving families. Services help give you the strengths you need to succeed, emphasize parent involvement, parent and worker teamwork and partnering with other service providers as necessary.

Multi-Systemic Therapy (MST): An intensive short-term treatment program that addresses all the factors in a child's environment that impact chronic and violent juvenile offenders -- their homes and families, schools and teachers, neighborhoods and friends. Each factor plays a critical role in a youth's world. And each factor requires attention when effective change is needed to improve the quality of life for youth and their families. MST works with high-risk and intensive cases, ages 9 through 17, who have a long history of arrests.